Folio

Stress and boredom can lead to overeating, says registered dietitian who offers sensible advice on snacking, grocery shopping and more.

01
April
2020

Being confined to your home during a pandemic can leave you feeling both stressed and bored, a combination that can mean overindulging in your isolation food supplies. 

“You’re in a constant state of not knowing what’s going on, you’re fearful, and that makes it tough to eat healthily,” said University of Alberta nutrition expert Sabina Valentine. 

Stress can increase our cortisol levels, which causes our appetites to change, Valentine said, and that can cause us to overeat and develop cravings for sugary and fatty foods.

Being stuck in our homes for long periods can also mean boredom—and combined with constant close proximity to the kitchen, that can lead to snacking, Valentine said.

“People are looking for comfort, they’re looking for an escape, and unfortunately food can sometimes provide that.”

However, this time can...

Folio - Headlines

31
March
2020
| 19:45 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A fitness expert starts blog to help people in isolation get exercise

Keeping up regular physical activity at home can stave off fitness losses—and may even help the immune system, says anatomy and biomechanics researcher.

When images emerged a fews weeks ago of people clumped together running stairs in the Edmonton
31
March
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Antiviral used to treat cat coronavirus could hold key to COVID-19: U of A researchers

Chemistry, biochemistry and virology labs team up to look for action against deadly human virus.

University of Alberta researchers are racing against the clock to test an antiviral drug that has
30
March
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

New drug could potentially offer better treatment for chronic heart failure

Global effort led by U of A’s Canadian VIGOUR Centre leads to potential first-in-class treatment to help reduce negative repercussions in patients with worsening chronic heart failure.

An experimental drug recently concluded a successful third-phase clinical trial and could
30
March
2020
| 13:55 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A health policy expert aims to cure COVID-19 ‘infodemic’

Timothy Caulfield will lead research to assess how false cures and conspiracy theories spread online, and recommend ways to contain potentially harmful bunk.

While scientists around the world scramble to find a vaccine for the novel coronavirus, University