Popular course earns hundreds of rave reviews to become the third highest-rated MOOC in the world overall.

14
February
2019

Mountains 101, one of the University of Alberta’s most popular massive open online courses, scaled the global heights of online education earlier this month to become the third highest-rated MOOC in the world.

That’s according to Class Central, an aggregator of more than 11,000 MOOCS from the world’s top universities.

In addition to placing Mountains 101 third on its list of the 50 highest rated MOOCs of all time, Class Central also ranked the course number one among science MOOCs last year, with 91 per cent of more than 300 reviewers giving it five out of five stars, and the rest giving it four.

With nearly 26,000 people registered, the course has reached participants in more than 170 countries since it launched two years ago.

"It's unique and accessible to a lot of users," said Dhawal Shah, founder and CEO of the Californ...

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19
February
2019

Can the power of humour affect change?

Sitcoms like ‘Little Mosque on the Prairie’ that poke fun at multicultural tensions are good for a universal laugh but unlikely to change attitudes in the long term, says researcher.

In 2007, Little Mosque on the Prairie had one of the most remarkable debuts in Canadian television
15
February
2019

New research offers insights into what keeps gay hockey players from coming out

Fear of becoming a distraction biggest concern among pro players keeping their sexual orientation under wraps, study suggests.

The overriding threat of becoming a distraction is the main barrier keeping professional hockey
13
February
2019

Ancient fossilized tracks suggest multicellular life far older than previously thought

Controversial discovery suggests early complex organisms may have originated 2.1 billion years ago—more than 1.5 billion years sooner than previous evidence indicated.

Newly discovered fossilized tracks suggest multicellular life could be 1.5 billion years older than
13
February
2019

Focusing on good management rather than emissions may help farmers address climate change

New study of Alberta farmers suggests scaling up practices that make economic and environmental sense rather than focusing only on carbon emissions.

Building on existing agricultural practices—and not pointing fingers at farming as a climate change