Cleared corridors used to locate oil reserves were mostly undamaged and provided refuge for plants and insects as surrounding forest burned, U of A researcher finds.

16
August
2019

Even as Alberta’s fierce wildfire raged in and around Fort McMurray in 2016, plants and butterflies were surviving in narrow strips of forest that remained green and undamaged.

Seismic lines, used to locate underground oil reserves, provided refuge from the blaze, said University of Alberta researcher Federico Riva, who outlined his recent findings after studying the area a year later.

RELATED: Rare butterfly species more abundant in older, wider seismic lines

Because the cleared corridors provided little fuel for the fire, they stayed almost intact, allowing plants and butterflies to survive “even when the surrounding forest was almost completely burned,” said Riva, a post-doctoral fellow. 

Of 107 plant and 46 butterfly species Riva observed, most were found to be more common in these corridors than in the neighbouring...

Folio - Headlines

15
August
2019
| 18:30 America/Tegucigalpa

First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts

U of A research team receives $3.3 million to create data-sharing platform including results from both published and unpublished research.

Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch
14
August
2019
| 01:50 America/Tegucigalpa

Indigenous law and governance centre at U of A receives federal funding

Wahkohtowin Law and Governance Lodge uses Indigenous legal traditions to support community governance.

A new University of Alberta centre that supports Indigenous law and governance through
14
August
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Walking before dinner doesn’t lower blood sugar in people with Type 2 diabetes: study

New study contradicts previous findings, but researchers still recommend exercise for overall health benefits.

A brisk evening walk before dinner does not affect glucose levels in people with Type 2 diabetes,
13
August
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Why plastic bags are so hard to get rid of

Easy to make and convenient to use, petroleum-based plastics have no obvious alternative—but that’s slowly changing, say researchers.

In June, Canada joined a growing list of countries frustrated with the inability of market forces