Jump in doctoral graduates over past decade offers opportunity for “brain gain” in Canada’s post-secondary sector and beyond.

26
June
2019

Grad school might be fear-inducing, given the online proliferation of horror stories of research gone wrong. But for most PhD students at the University of Alberta, the long hours, gruelling revisions and looming deadlines are a launching pad to a meaningful career. 

A new labour market outcome study conducted by the U of A tracked 4,365 PhDs graduating over a 12-year period ending in 2017. It found that 56 per cent remained on campuses, another 29 per cent work in the private sector and 12 per cent are in the public sector.

 

Half are either in tenure track academic positions or in professions like law and engineering. Another 14 per cent are scientists or researchers working outside the post-secondary sector.

The study also found a net “brain gain” of 831 PhDs, thanks largely to international students, nearly two-thirds o...

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26
June
2019

Injury expert recommends roll bars, driver training for quad riders

Goal to prevent death by crushing or suffocation.

A controversial new law proposed in Australia to make roll bars mandatory on all quads is a model
26
June
2019

Highway medians are a food source for wildlife, study shows

Small mammals are foraging in vegetation growing in medians—and getting to it by using passages meant to help them cross highways, according to U of A biologist.

Small animals such as weasels, mink and chipmunks are using highway medians as food sources,
25
June
2019

New website helps people avoid swimmer’s itch

Online resource created by U of A researchers lets people report cases in lakes across North America, alert others and learn more about the common water rash.

People wondering about catching swimmer’s itch can get in the know with a University of Alberta
24
June
2019

Too much screen time hurts toddlers’ social skills, new study shows

More screen time linked with increased trouble relating to others and following rules, and higher likelihood of displaying disruptive behaviour.

Toddlers who spend too much time watching television or using devices like tablets have been shown