Maintaining the popular sandbar would be “bigger than having a new arena” for families, says U of A urban planning expert.

22
May
2018

Edmonton’s “accidental beach” should become a permanent part of the river valley, says a University of Alberta urban sociology expert.

“It’s one of the things that’s been missing,” said Rob Shields of the U of A’s City-Region Studies Centre. “It’s one more thing to do in Edmonton and one more place to take the kids. It also gets more people into the river valley and you see the city differently.”

City council’s executive committee will meet tomorrow to debate whether and where to construct a permanent beach in the city.

 

The current beach formed unexpectedly while a new bridge was being built over the North Saskatchewan River in 2017. Caused by a construction berm that slowed the water, the pop-up beach delighted residents used to a river with a skimpy, mucky shoreline.

The silky piece of land on the river’s south shore...

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18
May
2018

Embracing ‘citified’ agriculture means rethinking land use priorities, says U of A researcher

Although beneficial, urban agriculture only scratches the surface of how cities need to be rethought.

Community gardens, the feel-good darlings of the growing season, are great for raising awareness
18
May
2018

Why you hear Laurel or Yanny

U of A linguists explain how one word can sound so different to so many people.

The latest this-or-that debate—do you hear Laurel or Yanny?—that’s been raging on the Internet this
17
May
2018

Why there’s more to funding drugs and medical treatments than the greatest good for the greatest number

Given proper context, people are willing to fund costly drugs and treatments for rare diseases even at the expense of treatments for larger populations, study shows.

One in 50,000 Canadian men suffer from a rare genetic disorder that results in progressive vision
16
May
2018

Strange alchemy: engineer, historian team up to create fiction

Chemical engineer uses elaborate charts and storyboards to partner with historian to bring British history to life in series of mystery novels.

Robert Hayes admits writing is not his forte. The chemical engineer has written a number of