It doesn’t matter what tools you have, it’s about how you use them to teach, says education expert.

21
September
2018

France’s recent decision to pass a law banning the use of cellphones, tablets and smart watches at school for children under 15 is just the latest example of moral panic around new digital technologies, according to a University of Alberta education researcher.

Suzanna Wong, an adjunct professor in the Department of Elementary Education, said digital devices are subject to the same backlash provoked by everything from the printing press to ballpoint pens, based on the reflexive distrust of a paradigm-shifting tool.

“It doesn’t matter what tools you have, it’s the pedagogy. How are you going to use that tool? How are you going to teach with it?” Wong said.

“I can see [a smartphone] as a very powerful teaching and learning tool. You have a camera so you can do video, you can document what you’ve learned, you can share what you’v...

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24
September
2018

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September
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19
September
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Thawing permafrost may release more CO2 than previously thought, study suggests

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