U of A researchers identify a way to possibly prevent ruptures in the body’s main pipeline for pumping blood.

13
August
2018

It’s a silent, sudden and almost assured killer: a thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) occurs when a weak spot or bulge in the body’s main pipeline for pumping blood suddenly ruptures, cutting off the supply of life-sustaining blood and flooding the chest or abdomen with it.

“Currently there is no routine screening or ideal way to treat this vascular disease that occurs in any gender at any age,” said Zamaneh Kassiri, a professor at the University of Alberta’s Cardiovascular Research Centre, who added that actor John Ritter’s death in 2003 from aortic dissection helped draw attention to the underdiagnosed, undertreated diseases of the aorta.

However, there is hope for a future treatment thanks to Kassiri’s study published in Circulation Research, which shows that a protease called ADAM17 that regulates a number of cell functions is a...

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13
August
2018

COMMENTARY || How soccer games can help protect wildlife

Conservation organizations are increasingly using the ties that bind people together in community-based sporting events to promote wildlife conservation.

A whistle blows and young men in brightly coloured jerseys race towards a soccer ball on a grassy
13
August
2018

COMMENTARY || Opportunity to play matters as much for elite athletes as amateur athletes

Letting players play through mistakes was major factor in Golden Knights’ success, argues educational psychologist.

As usual, there’s non-stop chatter and hullabaloo this off-season about Oilers players. Rightly so.
10
August
2018

New app for nature lovers helps create biodiversity network

NatureLynx allows users to collect observations, share them and ask questions.

A new University of Alberta app is encouraging Albertans to get back to nature and talk about
10
August
2018

COMMENTARY || Wildfires will only get worse unless we learn how to live with them

Increasingly unmanageable wildfire activity is forcing officials to re-envision how we manage fire in Canada.

Wildfire activity and its impact are increasing around much of the world. We see it on the news