UAlberta study shows how a combination of overweight moms, C-section delivery and bacteria in the gut may be to blame for increased risk of obesity in kids.

23
February
2018

Children delivered by caesarean section to overweight moms are five times more likely to be overweight or obese by the time they’re three months old, whereas those delivered vaginally were only three times more likely to be overweight, according to University of Alberta pediatric research.

“It was not particularly surprising to find that maternal overweight is linked to overweight in children,” said Anita Kozyrskyj, the U of A medical researcher who led the study.

“What was surprising is our finding that both the type of infant delivery—vaginal birth versus cesarean section birth—and changes in infant gut bacteria are involved.”

Kozyrskyj—one of the world’s leading researchers on the gut microbiome—and her research team studied more than 930 mothers and their three-month-old infants participating in AllerGen’s CHILD Study, a ...

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February
2018

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February
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February
2018

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