Chris Hedges coming to U of A to talk about what’s causing some of today’s biggest social ills and how to solve them.

19
March
2019

The loss of the sacred is at the root of many of today’s social ills, according to American journalist and activist Chris Hedges.

We live in a world where “nothing has intrinsic value beyond the monetary—not the natural world, not human beings,” Hedges told Folio in a telephone interview. It accounts for the rampant exploitation of workers by global capitalism, the rise of racism and homophobia in Western populist movements and the inadequate response to climate change, he said.

“Everything becomes a commodity that you exploit until exhaustion and collapse. It is fundamentally irreligious—not just in the Judeo-Christian tradition, but every other tradition as well.

“The severance from the sacred is what got us into all this trouble in the first place,” he said.

Hedges will expound on his argument at the U of A’s Augustana c...

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18
March
2019

Local cat killings linked to coyotes, study shows

U of A research provides basic signs that help officials determine a cat’s cause of death more easily.

After a spike of reported cat killings in the Edmonton and St. Albert areas in 2007, veterinary
15
March
2019

U of A president to step down next year

David H. Turpin announces he will finish his current term but not seek a renewal.

In what he calls one of the most difficult decisions of his career, David H. Turpin said he will
15
March
2019

Why there’s more to St. Patrick than shamrocks and green beer

U of A historian reveals surprising truths about the namesake of the annual celebration of all things Irish.

St. Patrick’s Day provides a welcome break from winter and a good excuse to toast everything Irish
14
March
2019

New book tells story of video game that lets players save doomed ballerina

Classical ballet meets modern gaming in ‘iGiselle,’ which puts a feminist twist on the heroine’s outdated ending.

Why does the ballerina always have to die? It’s a question that inspired English professor Nora