U of A computing scientist developing technology that could help platforms like Twitter and Facebook alert users to possible depression.

20
September
2019

A new technology using artificial intelligence detects depressive language in social media posts more accurately than current systems and uses less data to do it.

The technology, which was presented during the European Conference on Machine Learning and Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases, is the first of its kind to show that, to more accurately detect depressive language, small, high-quality data sets can be applied to deep learning, a commonly used AI approach that is typically data intensive.

Previous psycholinguistic research has shown that the words we use in interaction with others on a daily basis are a good indicator of our mental and emotional state. 

Past attempts to apply deep learning techniques to detect and monitor depression in social media posts have been shown to be tedious and expensi...

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19
September
2019
| 22:16 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A grads among most employable in Canada, according to new QS rankings

University ranks second in graduate employment rate and employer-student connections.

The University of Alberta held steady in a ranking that reaffirmed its graduates are among the
19
September
2019
| 19:00 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A, City of Edmonton join international network of city-university partnerships

First partnership within Canada will collaborate on projects involving sustainable buildings, elder care and connected vehicle networks.

The University of Alberta and the City of Edmonton will collaborate on three projects using the
18
September
2019
| 17:51 America/Tegucigalpa

What you need to know about pharmacare

U of A health economist outlines pros and cons of proposed federal drug plan.

Canadians are finally ready to tackle the “unfinished business” of medicare, according to
18
September
2019
| 17:42 America/Tegucigalpa

Regulatory heft needed to curb false promises on stem cells, says health law expert

Government, physicians and advertising regulators need to team up to protect the public from marketing of unproven treatments, argues U of A health-trend skeptic Timothy Caulfield.

The legal and regulatory tools designed to protect the public from the marketing of unproven stem