U of A experts explain how food-borne illness happens, what you can do to avoid it and what to do if you’re hit with it.

23
August
2019

You’re sick, woozy and deeply regretting that second helping of potato salad from yesterday’s picnic, because you’re now one of the four million Canadians hit with a case of food poisoning every year.

Even harder to swallow is the fact that it’s almost completely avoidable. 

  Kitchen tips to avoid food poisoning

U of A experts Lee Green and Norman Neumann offer these kitchen rules to avoid food poisoning:

Use a plastic—not wooden—cutting board for meat and fish and clean it in the dishwasher. Don’t use it to cut other foods. Don’t leave perishable food sitting at room temperature for more than 20 or 30 minutes. Use warm, soapy water to wash kitchen countertops. Use a scrub brush to wash dishes, because dishcloths and sponges breed bacteria. If you use dishcloths, change them daily. Sponges should be allowed to ...

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22
August
2019
| 01:37 America/Tegucigalpa

Federal funding broadens global education opportunities for Canadian students

New $148-million pilot program will give up to 11,000 university and college students across Canada a chance to gain international experiences and skills.

Monica Shandal said she always wanted to use her abilities to make a difference and help people but
22
August
2019
| 17:26 America/Tegucigalpa

Starting out in smaller communities may be better for refugees in short term

New U of A study also suggests larger cities have more success helping refugees settle in the long term because of better access to jobs, supports and services.

Syrian refugees are more satisfied with settlement services and their community when they spend
22
August
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A researcher using AI to get a step ahead of wildfires

New tools could map out complex weather data to help firefighters predict where forest fires are likely to break out.

Weather and fuel—two leading wildfire culprits—are now in the crosshairs of a University of Alberta
21
August
2019
| 17:00 America/Tegucigalpa

First-person memories stay sharper longer, research suggests

Our ability to edit our memories allows us to grow and change how we perceive ourselves and our experiences, says U of A psychology researcher.

The perspective through we which recall our memories—seeing them through our own eyes as a