Business

Six STEM graduates from U of A aim to commercialize technology ranging from better pregnancy tests for cows to more efficient batteries and faster tests for bacteria in water.

17
September
2020

It didn’t take long for Matthew Nickel and Hillary Sweet to venture out on their own after they graduated from the University of Alberta in 2018 with PhDs in biomedical and materials engineering.

“Afterwards we worked for about six months, and then Hillary said, 'Hey, you want to start a company?'” said Nickel, co-founder of SN Biomedical. “I said ‘why not?’ so we decided to start a biotech company with a goal to make simple and affordable diagnostic tests.”

Nickel explained the biggest problems in diagnostic testing in health care are speed and cost, especially when someone is sent for blood work, which requires lab work and a few days to get the results back. 

“The vision of the company is to develop technology to help people have tests done right there in the clinic,” he said. “However, you can't really just pop up a startu...

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19
October
2020
| 12:59 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A strengthens agricultural expertise

Three-year, $3.7-million grant agreement with Alberta government boosts capacity for research that will benefit farmers and consumers.

The University of Alberta’s agricultural research capacity is being strengthened as it welcomes key programs being transferred from the Government of Alberta. The Faculty of Agricultural, Life &
11
September
2020
| 08:00 America/Tegucigalpa

New research reveals what makes condos sell

Construction and design features matter more to buyers than price or age of properties, engineering researchers find.

Physical features such as construction materials, interior finishes and air conditioning are better determinants of how well a condo sells than price or building age, according to a University of
24
August
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Why not using cash during COVID-19 could make you more likely to overspend

U of A experts offer tips on how to handle your money during the pandemic—including decontaminating bills and coins.

Many businesses worried about COVID-19 contamination are touchy about taking cash, but the greater risk may be in overusing our plastic, warn University of Alberta experts. Shoppers using credit
29
July
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Improving energy efficiency, reducing emissions would save money for oilsands producers: study

Researchers looked at 15 strategies that would decrease sector’s energy use intensity, thereby lowering greenhouse gas emissions, and found increased profits from all of them.

Investment in new energy-efficient, greenhouse gas mitigation strategies by oilsands producers could net them some important profits, according to a model developed by a research group at the
22
July
2020
| 10:34 America/Tegucigalpa

Obesity rates likely to rise during COVID-19 pandemic, study suggests

New consumer psychology research shows people under financial stress want to eat more of everything.

As financial stress mounts, so does the desire for all kinds of foods, according to a University of Alberta study that hints the COVID-19 pandemic will increase obesity rates, especially among those
10
July
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Success begets success in crowdfunding—but so does falling just short, study shows

If entrepreneurs can’t follow in the footsteps of blockbuster ideas, they should aim to come in behind campaigns that nearly reached their goals, business researchers find.

Entrepreneurs looking to raise money on crowdfunding sites are better off following in the footsteps of ideas that fell just short of their fundraising goals than coming in behind projects that
06
July
2020
| 10:52 America/Tegucigalpa

Research reveals which types of leaders are more likely to burn out

Being too hands-off can be as stressful for leaders as being too engaged, U of A researcher finds.

Being everything to everyone or being too hands-off are leadership styles that are more likely to lead to burnout in managers, according to a University of Alberta business study. “Depending on
02
July
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Five ways COVID-19 will change the food business

New eating and shopping habits likely here to stay as pandemic measures ease, U of A food economist predicts.

Eating at home more and sticking with online delivery or takeout are habits likely to persist even as pandemic measures ease, according to a University of Alberta expert. “The ‘new normal’ is
29
June
2020
| 05:55 America/Tegucigalpa

Investing in green future easier said than done for Alberta, say economists

Capitalizing on an educated workforce and taking a hard look at taxation would help the province diversify its post-pandemic economy, according to two U of A experts.

UPDATED July 3, 2020: A previous version of this story noted that economics researcher Bob Ascah is a current fellow of the U of A's Institute for Public Economics. It has been updated to note
25
June
2020
| 05:50 America/Tegucigalpa

Repurposing spaces left vacant by COVID-19 could breathe new life into cities, says researcher

New guide shows how planners can revive social life of urban centres by shifting focus of vacant spaces from commercial to cultural.

In the wake of economic fallout from COVID-19, urban centres could see a sharp increase in abandoned spaces as some businesses are forced to close. But vacant space doesn’t have to sit idle,
17
June
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Why Canada needs more people to keep working longer

Putting off retirement could make sense for both employees and employers, says U of A gerontology researcher.

Organizations in Canada will be faced with shortages of skilled workers if they don’t find ways to keep retiring ones working longer, according to a University of Alberta gerontology researcher who