Health & Wellness

It may sound like fiction but science is slowly unlocking secrets to aging.

11
October
2017

Can we turn back the clock on aging? Maybe not, but by being kind to our body’s cells, we can slow the process, and take heart: scientific breakthroughs may one day add decades to our lives, says a University of Alberta cell biologist.

“Aging is a disease, not a fate, and science is helping to make that a reality,” said Torah Kachur, who teaches in the Faculty of Science and delivers public lectures about advances in cell biology and immunology.

 

Within 20 years—in time for the next generation—cell research will be advanced enough to slow down or even stop the aging process in humans, she said.

“Right now science is intervening post-disease, but the experts are asking, what if we apply cell therapies before you need them, so you never do? It sounds like science fiction in some ways, but there are scientifically sound step...

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23
November
2017

Asthma in infant boys may eventually be reversible

Groundbreaking UAlberta study shows there’s an additional—potentially treatable—reason pregnant moms with asthma pass it on.

A new University of Alberta study showed that mothers passing on asthma to their children is not just an issue of genetics; in fact, it may even be preventable. Microbiome epidemiologist Anita
23
November
2017

Privately sponsored refugees not getting health care they need

UAlberta research shows system rife with communication barriers is also failing to address needs.

Refugees arriving to Alberta face significant barriers in a health-care system that isn’t designed to address their unique health needs, according to University of Alberta
23
November
2017

You know you’re stressed when...

One student shares how bad her stress gets come exam time. Coping recommendations included.

Fourth-year University of Alberta student Brooke Taylor* is so stressed out during the school year that she sleeps on average less than five hours a night. “I started using a sleep app to
21
November
2017

Substance use researcher clears the smoke around cannabis legalization

UAlberta expert to dispel marijuana myths and weigh the best policy options for Alberta in free public lecture this week.

With cannabis legalization quickly approaching, there is considerable hype around the entrepreneurial opportunity it will offer growers and distributors, the tax revenue that could fall to federal
21
November
2017

COMMENTARY || Addressing 'alternative facts' about Lyme disease

For-profit labs and misleading information online are creating confusion about diagnosis and treatment of the tick-borne illness.

Lyme disease has recently gained much attention in the media and has become politicized in the United States and also in Canada. Vocal individuals and groups have implied&n
20
November
2017

COMMENTARY || We need minimum safety standards on the Trans Canada Trail

With more than 15,000 km on roads or in waterways, Canada's 'Great Trail' is neither safe nor accessible.

Hundreds of thousands of Canadians—including elementary schools, youth clubs, health agencies, grieving families, fraternal organizations, religious institutions, small businesses, sports
20
November
2017

Preschoolers getting too much screen time

New guidelines help parents know how much kids should be moving, sitting and sleeping over a whole day.

More than three-quarters of Canadian kids aged four and under are spending too much time in front of screens, which can lead to language delays, reduced attention and lower school
20
November
2017

Smart blood pressure cuff coming soon, thanks to startup support

Promising UAlberta spinoffs, patent holders singled out for recognition by TEC Edmonton.

Discouraged by the lack of innovation in diagnosing high blood pressure—the number one risk of death and disability globally—Raj Padwal led a team of medical researchers who invented a
17
November
2017
The racks of cut-rate, bruised fruit and vegetables in the discount aisle were always the first stop for Ria Rana’s mother while grocery shopping. As a teen, Rana wondered why they
16
November
2017

First clinical trial of its kind to test benefits of exercise for prostate cancer patients

Healthy dose of exercise could buy patients time before needing invasive treatment, researcher says.

In the first ever clinical trial of its kind, a researcher at the University of Alberta will test whether exercise can help patients with prostate cancer stave off invasive medical
16
November
2017

Why doctors are suggesting doing away with annual physical check-ups

Task force recommends patients visit doctors only when they’re ill, managing chronic conditions or getting periodic age-specific health checks.

The long-standing practice of visiting your doctor every year for a “complete” physical is not an effective strategy for improving health outcomes through preventive screening, said Neil