Health & Wellness

Gradually moving more and sitting less an easier place to start than formal exercise programs, U of A researchers find.

13
December
2019

Being physically active is important for people managing multiple sclerosis, but formal exercise isn’t the only way, say University of Alberta researchers. 

Gradually fitting more movement into their everyday lives is more attainable for people struggling with mobility, fatigue, depression and other symptoms of the nerve disease, said Patricia Manns, a professor in the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine. 

“Sometimes there’s a belief that if exercise isn’t done as a formal workout, it doesn’t count, but sitting less and moving more, taking more steps or standing more is much more feasible as an easier place to start,” she said.

That message is proving helpful in encouraging people with MS to be more active and improve their quality of life, according to a new study co-authored by Manns. 

The research team monitored 40 partic...

Headlines

12
December
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Study seeks to help immigrant seniors overcome barriers to exercise

Group walking program helps older immigrants feel safe and make social connections while getting physical activity, U of A researchers find.

More tailored and culturally appropriate activity programs would help immigrant populations overcome cultural and other barriers to exercise, according to new research out of the University of
11
December
2019
| 17:37 America/Tegucigalpa

Think you have sciatica? It’s not as common as people assume, says physical therapy expert

U of A researcher recommends exercise over painkillers for treating the painful nerve condition.

While sciatica is one of the most common forms of back pain, people often assume they have it when they don’t, says U of A physical therapy researcher Greg Kawchuk. That’s because the
09
December
2019
| 21:30 America/Tegucigalpa

Newly proposed model for shape of HIV-1 viral shell may change how we understand the disease

“If our model is correct, then we can begin investigating ways we could block or interrupt the mechanism of viral entry.”

The shell of the HIV-1 virus may have a different shape than previously thought, according to a new study by University of Alberta that has significant implications for understanding how the virus
05
December
2019
| 21:38 America/Tegucigalpa

DNA testing for siblings of children with autism may predict diagnosis before symptoms appear

Ten-year study is first to measure predictive value of genetic alterations related to autism spectrum disorder.

New research led by the Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Alberta shows that testing the DNA of siblings of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may predict a future diagnosis
05
December
2019
| 19:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Edmonton company headed by U of A cancer researcher secures $109M partnership to create new inflammatory disease therapies

Work will accelerate other University of Alberta research to create new drugs to block the spread of cancer.

An Edmonton company headed by a University of Alberta cancer researcher is developing new therapies to treat autoimmune and inflammatory diseases thanks to a $109-million research and collaboration
03
December
2019
| 18:00 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A, biotech company team up to study whether medical cannabis could treat neurological conditions

U of A and Atlas Biotechnologies to explore use of medical cannabis for treating MS, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases.

A new partnership between the University of Alberta and Atlas Biotechnologies will explore the use of medical cannabis for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s
02
December
2019
| 16:58 America/Tegucigalpa

‘Bad death’ hurts more for loved ones left behind: study

Research points to rise in deep grief as more families are left wondering what more could have been done.

Grief is difficult to bear, but when you believe your loved one died badly, it’s even worse, according to a new University of Alberta study. “It could be dying in pain or with other unrelieved
02
December
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Micro implants could restore standing and walking

U of A research has a proven concept to restore spinal function.

When Vivian Mushahwar first applied to grad school, she wrote about her idea to fix paralysis by rewiring the spinal cord. It was only after she was accepted into a bioengineering program that the
28
November
2019
| 13:55 America/Tegucigalpa

COMMENTARY || Caring for caregivers should be top priority

Amid staffing shortages and an aging population, improving job satisfaction among caregiving professionals is key to ensuring high-quality care in Canada, argue experts.

More than 220,000 Canadians currently reside in a nursing home or long-term care facility, with the number projected to increase steadily as the Canadian population ages. This may include our
25
November
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

More than a quarter of young Canadians aged 15 to 19 are caregivers, research shows

Caring for family members or friends poses challenges to teens’ health, social development and educational prospects, U of A researcher finds.

More than a quarter of Canadians between the ages of 15 and 19 are providing care for friends and family—and it could be limiting their chances in life, according to new University of Alberta
22
November
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Videos, ebooks help parents decide when children need to go to ER

Common childhood ailments are demystified with accessible resources, say researchers.

The best way to inform parents of the latest evidence on the diagnosis and treatment of childhood illnesses is to tell them a story, according to the researchers behind an innovative program at the