Health & Wellness

It may sound like fiction but science is slowly unlocking secrets to aging.

11
October
2017

Can we turn back the clock on aging? Maybe not, but by being kind to our body’s cells, we can slow the process, and take heart: scientific breakthroughs may one day add decades to our lives, says a University of Alberta cell biologist.

“Aging is a disease, not a fate, and science is helping to make that a reality,” said Torah Kachur, who teaches in the Faculty of Science and delivers public lectures about advances in cell biology and immunology.

 

Within 20 years—in time for the next generation—cell research will be advanced enough to slow down or even stop the aging process in humans, she said.

“Right now science is intervening post-disease, but the experts are asking, what if we apply cell therapies before you need them, so you never do? It sounds like science fiction in some ways, but there are scientifically sound step...

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20
October
2017

How not to let ankle injuries trip you up

Rest, build strength and be patient to get back on your feet.

Whether it’s an icy sidewalk or a missed curb, putting a foot wrong can result in an ankle injury. Knowing how to treat a sprain is key to keeping a bounce in your step. A sore ankle is one
18
October
2017

Technology to unleash good viruses on bad bacteria to be used for food safety

UAlberta engineering team was asked to create dry powder trojan-horse virus to fight deadly bacteria in East Africa.

The UAlberta engineering team that demonstrated the formula for killing bacteria by unleashing a virus that can be manufactured in a powder has been asked to turn that technology on a food-borne
16
October
2017

Uncovering origins of developmental brain disorders could eventually help treat seizures

UAlberta research gives new insight into healthy brain development.

Recent research discoveries in the development of brain disorders could pave the way to new therapies for treating seizures, and even some children with autism, says a leading oncologist and
13
October
2017

Doing for chemical research what Google did for search tools

UAlberta spinoff company has potential to completely rework chemical research—especially for pharmaceuticals.

A new UAlberta spinoff company has the potential to radically transform the process of chemical research by uniting the power of big data with the world of molecular discovery. The concept,
11
October
2017

Transgender youth are the real experts at identifying the challenges they face, study finds

First-of-its-kind survey also shows disturbing rates of abuse directed at Alberta’s transgender youth.

A groundbreaking survey has found that safety, violence and discrimination are major issues for transgender youth in Alberta. And the University of Alberta education professor who led the research in
05
October
2017

New handheld technology promises to stop unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions

UAlberta-designed device uses nanotechnology to quickly identify whether the cause of an infection is viral or bacterial.

UAlberta researchers are developing a handheld device that will help reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions, in an effort to ensure the drugs maintain their effectiveness in the wake of growing
05
October
2017

Policy needed to protect Alberta youth health from poor diets

Government intervention will help teens make healthy choices in our high-risk food environment, according to UAlberta’s provincial nutrition report card.

Alberta could do much more to provide nutritional support for its youth, according to UAlberta’s annual 2017 Alberta Nutrition Report Card on Food Environments for Children and
04
October
2017

Nursing student helped injured man during Saturday night’s attack in Edmonton

‘I’m just so grateful that I was able to do what I could.’

If fourth-year UAlberta nursing student Nena Powell had any reservations about her chosen profession, they were silenced with the constant and willful beat of a human heart. Last Saturday night,
04
October
2017

Imaging agents developed to better monitor growth of tumours

New tools would help doctors make better and quicker treatment decisions for cancer patients.

UAlberta researchers have created two new imaging agents that could help physicians visualize the formation of tumour-associated blood vessels, keep track of tumour growth and possibly generate new
27
September
2017

Putting medical students in the patient's shoes

Volunteers with chronic illnesses tutor future doctors.

Suzanne has seen it often: that glaze that comes over a doctor’s eyes when she begins to describe her condition and symptoms, the same ones she’s been dealing with year after year.
26
September
2017

That stiff back you have may not actually be stiff, UAlberta study finds

Feeling of stiffness may mean something else is going on in the back.

We all hear our friends say, “My back feels so stiff!” Well, it turns out those backs may not actually be stiff, according to a new study out of the University of Alberta