Science & Tech

Breakthrough could lead to faster, more accurate programs to train neural networks for machine learning.

15
October
2018

University of Alberta scientists have developed an atomic machine that acts like an electronic circuit—a breakthrough that could lead to faster, more accurate programs to train neural networks for machine learning.

The atomic electronic simulator, which uses precisely controlled patterns of atoms to control electrons, is the latest in a recent string of advances out of the U of A and Quantum Silicon Inc. that are paving the way for a new generation of atomic-scale, ultra-efficient electronics.

RELATED: Atomic-scale manufacturing sets forth electronics revolution akin to arrival of printing press RELATED: Atomic discovery opens door to greener, faster, smaller electronic circuitry

“Atoms are a bit like chairs that electrons sit on,” said Robert Wolkow, physics professor and principal investigator on the project. “Much as w...

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19
October
2018

Paleontologists discover 85-million-year-old ‘baby sea monster’

World’s smallest Tylosaurus fossil sheds new light on how the ancient marine predator developed its fearsome snout and teeth as it matured.

An 85-million-year-old fossil of a baby “sea monster” unearthed from a chalk formation in Kansas gives scientists a clearer idea of how ancient marine reptiles developed from infancy to
12
October
2018

Governments celebrate completion of $82.8-million infrastructure projects for U of A; federal government announces $39 million in new research funding

New student innovation centre, lab upgrades among 10 U of A projects completed thanks to joint federal-provincial Post-Secondary Institutions Strategic Investment Fund.

In the early morning of May 26, 2017, Ex-Alta 1, a small cube satellite designed and built by University of Alberta students, was deployed from the International Space Station. And while that
04
October
2018

New research about Martian moons contradicts long-held theory

The red planet’s two moons are likely pieces of the planet itself rather than stray asteroids, say scientists.

The two moons that orbit Mars are likely made up of chunks of the planet itself, contradicting a long-standing theory that the moons, Phobos and Deimos, were asteroids captured in Mars’ gravitational
02
October
2018

Around the world in 120 days: One student’s quest to bring renewable energy technology back home

U of A master’s student travels the world to learn more about how to bring geothermal technology to Canada.

A University of Alberta master’s student is going to the ends of the Earth to learn more about geothermal energy. Geoscience student Theron Finley is travelling to Alaska, Utah, Nevada,
01
October
2018

Scientists track nighthawks’ migration route in search of clues to species’ steep decline

New research on threatened birds’ 20,000 km annual journey from northern Alberta to the Amazon rainforest yields first insight to be used for conservation efforts.

In a quest to develop conservation strategies to protect a threatened species whose population has declined 80 per cent in the last 50 years, scientists at the University of Alberta have discovered
26
September
2018

Astronomers find first evidence of jets emitted by highly magnetic neutron stars

Discovery disproves existing theories and gives insight into how galaxies are formed.

An unexpected discovery by an international group of scientists disproves existing theories about how astrophysical jets are ejected from neutron stars. The group, which includes University of
19
September
2018

Thawing permafrost may release more CO2 than previously thought, study suggests

New research from U of A ecologists shows mineral weathering can be a significant contributor to Arctic climate change.

The amount of carbon dioxide released from thawing permafrost might be greater than previously thought because of a process called mineral weathering, according to a new study by University of
14
September
2018

New funding opens up 25 more spaces in computing science after-degree program at U of A

Funding comes as part of $50-million provincial investment that will add 3,000 tech-related spots across Alberta over the next five years.

When Jarrett Knauer was only a few months into his chosen career path, it dawned on him that just a slight shift in educational direction would multiply his options. “When you actually start to
10
September
2018

Seeing is believing when it comes to adopting green energy, study suggests

People are more likely to invest in solar energy technology when they see it being used in their communities, U of A sociologist finds.

Governments at all levels need to invest more heavily in promoting renewable energy if they want citizens to adopt these technologies, new research suggests. University of Alberta environmental
04
September
2018

Machine learning, and how it helps researchers make scientific discoveries much faster

What used to take months of painstaking research can now take mere hours, thanks to artificial intelligence that sifts through reams of complex data to reveal key information.

Jillian Buriak and her team spent years developing cost-effective plastic solar cells that can be printed like newspapers. Then she chatted with fellow chemistry researcher Arthur Mar, and in a just
31
August
2018

Newly discovered dinosaurs fill in evolutionary gap spanning 70 million years

Two fossils unearthed in northwestern China are missing links in evolution of an unusual lineage, according to scientists.

Two newly discovered dinosaurs may be missing links in an unusual lineage of predators that lived between 160 million and 90 million years ago, new research suggests. The two species, Xiyunykus