Science & Tech

Marine biologists hope their model can help other scientists and conservationists better understand how predators select their prey.

06
June
2019

A new model is providing insight into the impact of a venomous predatory fish that has invaded more than 7.3 million square kilometres in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, wreaking havoc among native fish populations.

Scientists have speculated that the invasive lionfish are so successful in the Atlantic because prey don’t recognize them as a predator, but that may not be the case, according to University of Alberta marine biologist Stephanie Green, who led a study on the lionfish.

 

“We found that reef fish enter the ‘danger zone’—close enough to be eaten—around invasive lionfish at similar rates to native predators. But for those prey that stray too close to lionfish, they are up to twice as likely to be captured than by predators that are naturally found on Caribbean reefs,” said Green.

The researchers suggest the li...

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26
June
2019

Highway medians are a food source for wildlife, study shows

Small mammals are foraging in vegetation growing in medians—and getting to it by using passages meant to help them cross highways, according to U of A biologist.

Small animals such as weasels, mink and chipmunks are using highway medians as food sources, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. “We observed animals foraging for
18
June
2019

Study of microbes essential to help solve climate change problems, say scientists

Microorganisms play critical role in climate change, both producing and consuming greenhouse gases, argues U of A biologist.

Ignoring the role of microorganisms could have dire consequences when it comes to climate change, according to a new statement issued by an international team of microbiologists. “Microbiology
06
June
2019

Sediment from fishing choking out sea sponges, study shows

New research shows sediment stirred up by human activity is clogging glass sea sponges on Canada’s West Coast.

Sediment stirred up from fishing activity has a detrimental effect on reef-building sea sponges in northern British Columbia, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. The
30
May
2019

Bird personalities influenced by age and experience, study shows

New research by U of A biologists also showed behavioural differences were maintained but physiological traits became more alike over two-year study.

Differences in the personalities of birds are related to both age and experience, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. The study examined the red knot, a medium-sized
26
May
2019

University mourns loss of passionate promoter of women in science and tech

Margaret-Ann Armour dedicated her life and career to diversity and the advancement of women in the sciences.

Margaret-Ann Armour, a beloved University of Alberta professor who helped blaze a trail for female scientists, died yesterday. She was 79. Co-founder of the Women in Scholarship, Engineering,
24
May
2019

More intense wildfires are here to stay and we need to adapt: report

Update on state of Canada’s mountain regions looks at human scale of ecological disaster wrought by changing climate.

Zac Robinson remembers hiking through B.C.’s Monashee Mountains last August and, on a cloudless day, staring directly into the sun. What made his look upwards a possibility was the smoke
22
May
2019

New research has potential to revolutionize diamond exploration

Study identifies lherzolite, previously only peripherally associated with diamond formation, as a source rock for diamond deposits.

A startling discovery has the potential to change diamond exploration in Canada and around the world. Research by geologists from the University of Alberta and De Beers Group, the world’s largest
22
May
2019

Study provides new insight into origin of Canadian Rockies

U of A research suggests mountains formed in sudden westward collision more than 100 million years ago, rather than gradual buildup of material.

The Canadian Rocky Mountains were formed when the North American continent was dragged westward during the closure of an ocean basin off the west coast and collided with a microcontinent more than
22
May
2019

Edmonton’s core offers most sustainable living, U of A study shows

Suburban surprise: Millwoods Town Centre area also ranks high in mapping of city’s most sustainable neighbourhoods.

A little piece of suburbia is challenging the communities in and around the downtown core as Edmonton’s most sustainable, according to a University of Alberta suitability review of the economic,
10
May
2019

Signature area will build on U of A expertise in current and future energy sources

University launches ‘Energy Systems’ bringing together 500 experts to drive research and teaching.

Growing up in rural Saskatchewan, Anne Naeth lived on a farm without power until her dad wired the house for a generator. “Suddenly, we became part of a new energy system, from oil lamps and fire
08
May
2019

West Edmonton neighbourhoods along LRT extension best for medium-density infill, study shows

U of A student researchers pinpoint city neighbourhoods most suitable to fill in “missing middle” of housing development.

Communities adjacent to the soon-to-be-completed Valley Line West LRT offer Edmonton the best opportunity to add much-needed population density to the city’s centre, according to a University of