Society & Culture

When women leaders have unconventional family lives, the media responds by trying to fit them into more stereotypical boxes, say researchers.

06
March
2019

When asked to draw a picture of a leader, most people draw a man. If asked to draw a portrait of a political leader’s family, most people would depict this man surrounded by his loyal wife and adoring children. These pictures would not be far from reality. Most government leaders are men whose wives and children have proven to be invaluable political accessories.

But this taken-for-granted picture of the politician’s family rests on the outdated assumption that men take charge of business and political affairs, while women take care of the household. What happens when women rise to elite political positions, and how are their familial roles reported by the media?

Our research has answered these questions by analyzing news reports about six former and current Canadian premiers who happen to be mothers. Unlike most female governmen...

Headlines

26
March
2019

Inuit well-being enhanced by connecting with the land, new study shows

Being on the tundra, sea ice and ocean is more than a getaway for Inuit—it’s intrinsic to their health and well-being, researchers find.

Supporting hunting and on-the-land practices in the Arctic would be an effective and inexpensive way to enhance Inuit health, according to new research. Working with the people of Gjoa Haven,
25
March
2019

U of A digitization project aims to make valuable research accessible to all

University teams up with Internet Archive to scan more than 14,000 thesis papers and make them available online.

The University of Alberta Libraries is digitizing more than 14,000 master’s and PhD theses produced at the university since its establishment in 1908, part of a program that aims to digitize as much
22
March
2019

Historic Dentistry/Pharmacy Centre enters next stage of redevelopment

Extensive renovations part of an asset management strategy, under development, looking at university’s buildings.

One of the University of Alberta’s most historic buildings is entering a new stage of redevelopment, part of a strategy to consolidate space for staff and programming, while providing the best
21
March
2019

Social justice a strong motivator for local atheist groups

U of A researcher looks into how Edmonton-based atheists find purpose and meaning after turning away from religion.

Edmonton has become a provincial hub of sorts for atheist groups with a social justice agenda, according to new research at the University of Alberta. As part of his doctoral research,
19
March
2019

‘Severance from the sacred’ behind many of world’s woes, says Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

Chris Hedges coming to U of A to talk about what’s causing some of today’s biggest social ills and how to solve them.

The loss of the sacred is at the root of many of today’s social ills, according to American journalist and activist Chris Hedges. We live in a world where “nothing has intrinsic value beyond the
15
March
2019

U of A president to step down next year

David H. Turpin announces he will finish his current term but not seek a renewal.

In what he calls one of the most difficult decisions of his career, David H. Turpin said he will not seek a renewal as president of the University of Alberta when his contract ends on June 30,
15
March
2019

Why there’s more to St. Patrick than shamrocks and green beer

U of A historian reveals surprising truths about the namesake of the annual celebration of all things Irish.

St. Patrick’s Day provides a welcome break from winter and a good excuse to toast everything Irish with green beer—but people might be surprised to find out just who the man they’re celebrating was,
14
March
2019

New book tells story of video game that lets players save doomed ballerina

Classical ballet meets modern gaming in ‘iGiselle,’ which puts a feminist twist on the heroine’s outdated ending.

Why does the ballerina always have to die? It’s a question that inspired English professor Nora Foster Stovel and a team of interdisciplinary researchers to create a computer game that lets
07
March
2019

Rare butterfly species more abundant in older, wider seismic lines

Finding highlights structural change in forest; impact on other insects remains unknown.

Seismic lines—used to measure underground oil reserves in Northern Alberta—seem to be good for butterflies, including one rare species. In one of the first studies to measure the impact of seismic
06
March
2019

Business student becomes literary sensation on Wattpad

With nine million readers worldwide, Brandon Wong has a fan base most established authors can only dream of.

By GEOFF McMASTER Brandon Wong just might be the biggest literary superstar you’ve never heard of. Nine million people around the world have read his first novel, Playing By the Rules, since
04
March
2019

Relationships, not training overload, main reason children quit competitive swimming

New study shows why coaches and parents should encourage young athletes to take part in sports for reasons beyond performance, says researcher.

Competitive adult swimmers who quit swimming as youths before returning to the sport later in life reported that they originally left because of an unsatisfactory social experience rather than