Society & Culture

Rhea Clyman is regarded as the first western journalist to expose the forced famine that killed millions of Ukrainians in the 1930s.

22
November
2019

She is considered the first western journalist to expose the Soviet famine-genocide that killed millions of Ukrainians in the early 1930s. But although Rhea Clyman sent numerous accounts of Soviet and Nazi atrocities to North American newspapers as a foreign correspondent, she was soon largely forgotten.

That is, until four years ago, when Jars Balan, director of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Alberta, began researching representations of Ukraine in the Canadian press between the first and second world wars. 

 

Sifting through newspaper archives of the period, a researcher assisting him at the institute came across an article by Clyman describing the Holodomor—Soviet leader Joseph Stalin’s forced famine—in the Toronto Telegram. Balan had never heard of her.

Digging further, his team discove...

Headlines

05
December
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Fentanyl now greatest risk to correctional officers’ safety in prisons

First study in Canada to look at impact of new opioids in prisons determines drug crisis “dramatically different” from previous ones.

Fentanyl and other new opioids are drastically altering the lives of inmates and correctional officers in Western Canada’s prisons, according to a study by two U of A sociologists. Despite efforts
04
December
2019
| 19:40 America/Tegucigalpa

New video game has players solve auditory puzzles to figure out fate of future Earth

Designed by U of A composer, “The Lost Garden” puts a sonic twist on classic puzzle game genre.

If you’ve always been more intrigued by sound than motion in video games, a new game by University of Alberta soundscape composer Scott Smallwood might be the perfect fit. The Lost Garden is a
04
December
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Nearly a quarter of Edmonton library patrons struggle with housing: study

Equitable access to public libraries helps socially vulnerable people maintain personal connections, says U of A researcher.

A public library should be equitable to all members of society, regardless of how they choose to use it, according to a new University of Alberta study that suggests libraries have a role to play in
03
December
2019
| 17:37 America/Tegucigalpa

Biodiversity should be on the agenda of local councils

U of A team examines implications of new legislation on municipalities at front lines of growing biodiversity crisis.

Albertans need to start seeing biodiversity as a local priority, University of Alberta researchers say. In a new report commissioned by the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, associate professor of
28
November
2019
| 19:50 America/Tegucigalpa

How retail peer pressure drives Black Friday in Canada

Early holiday sales may be a boon for consumers but put pressure on retailers’ profit margins, say experts.

Despite the booming sales that happen on Black Friday, most Canadian retailers would rather not discount heavily this time of year, because, all else being equal, they could sell a lot of product at
27
November
2019
| 18:55 America/Tegucigalpa

Affordable housing with social support helps lift teen parents out of ‘cycle of disadvantage’

Groundbreaking project by U of A researchers dispels myths about teen parents, shows proper support improves their confidence and reduces stress.

The development of children growing up in a housing support program for teen parents mirrors that of the general population, according to University of Alberta research that begins to dispel myths
27
November
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Polarizing language creating gridlock in energy debate, says U of A expert

Lightening up and avoiding hot-button labels could foster more rational discussion of Canada’s energy future, says engineering professor trained in rhetorical analysis.

A University of Alberta engineering professor is urging Canadians to cool down the discourse around energy issues by choosing words more carefully, avoiding hot-button labels that trigger
26
November
2019
| 22:03 America/Tegucigalpa

Athlete activism shown to affect attendance at games

Public protests like “taking a knee” result in lower attendance over subsequent games, according to study of U.S. college football teams.

On Nov. 7, 2015, 30 members of the University of Missouri Tigers football team linked arms and stood with student activist Jonathan Butler, who was in the midst of a hunger strike protesting racial
20
November
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Student who fought for her education vows to battle violence against women

“I feel a great responsibility to show there is another way for women to live,” says U of A master’s grad Esra Kazanbas.

For Esra Kazanbas, it was personal. Very personal. The 32-year-old from Istanbul is graduating from the University of Alberta today with a master’s degree in women’s and gender studies after
15
November
2019
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Land-based learning camp opens pathway to university for northern students

Ten-day camp challenges students in Gwich’in community to live on the land while earning high-school and university course credits.

When 17-year-old Kristopher Colin heard about the opportunity to earn university credits while participating in a fish camp near his home community of Fort McPherson, he knew he couldn’t pass it
12
November
2019
| 17:06 America/Tegucigalpa

Human-induced climate change dates back much further than we think: study

Evidence crowdsourced from archeologists worldwide suggests land use for hunting and farming has contributed to global warming for at least 5,000 years.

Human-induced climate change has origins far earlier than commonly assumed, according to a study published in the journal Science. Archeological evidence collected around the world suggests human