Society & Culture

Experts discuss women’s hockey, cross-country skiing, Russian athletes, being a host with a volatile neighbour, momentum for a Calgary Olympic bid and more.

09
February
2018

As the 2018 Winter Olympic Games kick off today in PyeongChang, South Korea, the sporting drama set to unfold over the next 17 days will happen amid a backdrop of the saga of banned Russian athletes, an unpredictable neighbour and a notable lack of NHL hockey players.

To help sort out the implications of these questions, as well as the impact these Games may have on a potential Calgary bid, and more, University of Alberta experts share their thoughts on what Canadians should watch for.

RELATED: Your UAlberta viewing guide for PyeongChang 2018

RELATED: How a UAlberta sports psychologist is helping Canada’s Olympic men’s curling team excel at the mental game

RELATED: Dispelling the myth of a non-political Olympics

Will Canadian female Olympians continue to outpace their male counterparts for medals?

The st...

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16
February
2018

How the 1988 Summer Olympics unexpectedly changed South Korea

And how the North and South are trying to use the PyeongChang Games to their own political advantage.

If the world learned anything from the Rio Olympics two years ago, it’s that sport can be a dangerous stage from which to announce your country has arrived. Take South Korea. While it staged
14
February
2018

How a former UAlberta coach created a pipeline between the university and the national bobsleigh team

Five of 19 members of the 2018 Canadian bobsleigh team are former UAlberta athletes.

A virtual pipeline from the Butterdome’s running track to the national bobsleigh course in Calgary has been filling Canadian Olympic-bound sleds for over a decade, and 2018 might be the
13
February
2018

Graduating students facing mental wellness risks

UAlberta recognizes need to support students plagued with anxiety over the job market.

Many students are still neck deep in their studies when they begin to worry about what their university degree will get them in the job market, according to Andre Costopoulos, the University of
12
February
2018

How a master’s student became an influential voice on Indigenous issues through social media

For writer Chelsea Vowel, speaking out against racism was a conduit to a powerful online community known as ‘Native Twitter.’

When Chelsea Vowel was following the news about the housing crisis in Attawapiskat in November 2011, she felt compelled to respond to the ignorance and tide of racism she was reading in the comments
08
February
2018

Gritty, updated production of classic Gorky play explores unchanging urban underworld

New production of ‘The Lower Depths’ offers striking parallels to contemporary social struggles.

Squatting together in an abandoned retail building, characters from a neglected underclass struggle with poverty, unemployment and opioid addiction. They do their best to survive in a rapidly
02
February
2018

Social scientist named new VP of research

Matthias Ruth wants to be catalyst in fostering a deeper culture of interdisciplinarity and engagement.

A social scientist with a PhD in geography who was also trained as an economist, studied physics, biology and engineering along the way, and has an appointment in a civil engineering department, was
31
January
2018

How a UAlberta sports psychologist is helping Canada’s Olympic men’s curling team excel at the mental game

John Dunn offers an inside look at how Team Koe is mentally preparing for PyeongChang.

The road to the 2018 Winter Olympics began in earnest for University of Alberta sport psychologist John Dunn last December when he was part of the coaching staff for Kevin Koe’s Alberta rink at
30
January
2018

The scourge of Boko Haram is far from over

The terrorist group may seem to be in retreat locally, but the threat could still spill beyond Nigeria’s borders.

It was once declared the world’s deadliest terrorist organization, deploying hundreds of young women and children as suicide bombers. In 2014 there was global outrage when its militants
29
January
2018

Lots of sexting can wreck a romance

Tech-communication shortcut undermines features of strong relationships.

Sexting—sharing sexual messages and images by cellphone or other web-connected devices—can spice up your sex life, but it may be at the expense of other important aspects of your
26
January
2018

New degree in fashion business management launches this fall

First such BSc program offered in Western Canada opens new doors to leadership in fashion industry.

Students interested in the business of designing and producing clothing and textiles can now earn a bachelor of science degree in that discipline at the University of Alberta, beginning in September
26
January
2018

Is the high today gone tomorrow? Study to explore how long cannabis impairment lasts

New research aims to fill evidence gap as legalization looms.

A new study aims to clear the haze around cannabis impairment, gauging which cognitive functions are most affected and how long the impairment lasts. University of Alberta