Society & Culture

U of A librarian offers advice to help you sift through an endless stream of info and sort out what’s accurate and trustworthy.

08
July
2020

In the age of COVID-19, news articles and information about the disease, and what we should be doing to prevent its spread, are endless. But how can you tell what information is accurate, what’s purely speculative and what’s just plain wrong?

Part of the challenge with COVID-19 is that it’s so new. 

“There’s so much research that’s happening on the virus and the pandemic, and so much that is unknown,” said Kara Blizzard, a librarian at the University of Alberta's Augustana Campus who teaches information literacy skills to students. “More information comes out all the time, and it’s always changing, so it can be difficult to know what to read and what to trust.”

Blizzard recommends a few steps you can take to evaluate the information you’re receiving and make sure what you’re reading, watching and listening to is trustworthy an...

Headlines

13
July
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Flu deaths rise when cities get pro sports teams, study shows

New research has implications for reopening arenas to fans during COVID-19 pandemic.

When one of the big four professional sports leagues in North America expands into a new market, it brings with it an increase in influenza-related deaths, according to a University of Alberta sport
10
July
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Success begets success in crowdfunding—but so does falling just short, study shows

If entrepreneurs can’t follow in the footsteps of blockbuster ideas, they should aim to come in behind campaigns that nearly reached their goals, business researchers find.

Entrepreneurs looking to raise money on crowdfunding sites are better off following in the footsteps of ideas that fell just short of their fundraising goals than coming in behind projects that
10
July
2020
| 05:55 America/Tegucigalpa

COMMENTARY || Why some people are immune from scandal—until they’re not

Media play a role in determining whether bad behaviour makes public figures fall from grace, say management experts.

Scandals are violent shocks to social systems in which public figures may “fall from grace.” Societies have long been captivated by scandals embroiling powerful people—film producer Harvey Weinstein
09
July
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

New report aims to help prevent incels from turning to violence

U of A political science students analyze surveys of “involuntary celibates” to help mental health professionals gain understanding, build trust and offer social support.

Two political science students at the University of Alberta have written a background report to help social workers, psychologists and other practitioners prevent involuntary celibates, or “incels,”
08
July
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Public acceptance of protective masks growing in Canada

Rapid shift in perception shows people are heeding public health advice—and points to differences in how Asian and non-Asian Canadians view wearing masks, say U of A researchers.

Public acceptance of protective face masks has evolved dramatically in Canada since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new psychology research from the University of
07
July
2020
| 16:24 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A ranked among world’s top energy research universities

University of Alberta lands in top 50 in three energy-related subjects—including eighth in petroleum engineering—in updated QS rankings.

The University of Alberta is among the world’s best, if not the best, energy research universities according to an updated version of the QS World University Rankings by Subject, which also placed
07
July
2020
| 10:30 America/Tegucigalpa

COMMENTARY || As a Sufi singer, I believe the sounds of world religions can cultivate compassion during COVID-19

Developing an "intercultural ear" can help prevent us from isolating ourselves from diverse communities in our midst, says U of A ethnomusicologist.

The global COVID-19 pandemic has taken us into an era of social distancing. By relying on online digital media, we may be isolating ourselves from more local and diverse communities. As an
07
July
2020
| 08:48 America/Tegucigalpa

Majority of Chinese-Canadians say they’ve experienced discrimination because of COVID-19: study

Media coverage, political tension between Canada and China may be fuelling ‘shadow pandemic’ of racist behaviour, says U of A social psychologist.

A majority of Chinese-Canadians say they have been victims of discrimination as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new research by the University of Alberta and Angus Reid
07
July
2020
| 05:55 America/Tegucigalpa

COMMENTARY || As other leagues rethink racist team names, it’s time to rename the Edmonton Eskimos

Team's statement in support of Black Lives Matter movement rings hollow without action, argues Inuk writer and scholar.

In the space of a few hours on July 3, three North American sports teams announced they were going to reassess their racist names. Baseball’s Cleveland Indians, the Washington Redskins of the
06
July
2020
| 10:52 America/Tegucigalpa

Research reveals which types of leaders are more likely to burn out

Being too hands-off can be as stressful for leaders as being too engaged, U of A researcher finds.

Being everything to everyone or being too hands-off are leadership styles that are more likely to lead to burnout in managers, according to a University of Alberta business study. “Depending on
02
July
2020
| 06:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Five ways COVID-19 will change the food business

New eating and shopping habits likely here to stay as pandemic measures ease, U of A food economist predicts.

Eating at home more and sticking with online delivery or takeout are habits likely to persist even as pandemic measures ease, according to a University of Alberta expert. “The ‘new normal’ is