Society & Culture

“The generation as a whole is among the most educated it has ever been, but the path to success is also less clear.”

28
January
2020

The Harvard Business Review recently published findings of a study on mental health in the workplace that paints a bleak picture of anxiety among young people.

In a survey, half of millennials, those between 24 and 39, said they’d left a job at least partly for mental health reasons. For Gen Z—those between 18 and 23—the percentage spikes to 75, compared with just 20 per cent among the general population.

The results of the study, published by the mental health advocacy group Mind Share Partners, are one measure of how serious anxiety and depression have become among today’s youth.

At the University of Alberta, for example, its website states that 35 per cent of students will experience a panic attack due to stress at some point, and mental health advisers on campus say requests for help with anxiety and depression are sharply...

Headlines

21
February
2020
| 19:15 America/Tegucigalpa

‘Never boring’: New book recounts life and legacy of composer Malcolm Forsyth

Celebrated classical composer and U of A music professor remembered by family, friends, colleagues and students.

Malcolm Forsyth was on death’s door when he attended the premiere of his choral composition, “A Ballad of Canada,” at Ottawa’s National Arts Centre in June 2011. “He had been hospitalized with
20
February
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Tiny versions of ancient spear-throwing weapons were likely used to train children, U of A archeologists find

Scaled-down atlatls found in Oregon suggest Indigenous children in Pacific Northwest were taught to hunt from an early age.

New archeological evidence suggests ancient Indigenous children of the Pacific Northwest were likely trained to hunt using small, scaled-down weapons. University of Alberta anthropologist Robert
19
February
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Up to 70 per cent of us feel like a fraud, says U of A psychologist

“Impostor syndrome” even more common among high-achieving graduate students.

Ever felt like you don’t belong, like you faked it to get where you are or it’s only a matter of time before you’re unmasked as a fraud? You may suffer from impostor syndrome, according to Becky
13
February
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

U of A shortens residence leases to align with academic year

Lease terms reduced from 11 months to eight months in response to feedback from students, former residents.

Undergraduate residences at the University of Alberta will all be moved to eight-month leases to better align with the academic year, the university said today. The change will take effect in
12
February
2020
| 01:06 America/Tegucigalpa

COMMENTARY || Oscar snub of 'Little Women' shows the limits of Hollywood feminism

Greta Gerwig's omission from best director category reinforces her film’s assertion that creative women are not celebrated as much as men, argue authors.

The Oscars have long represented a way for the American film industry to celebrate and market its achievements. Even when there are surprising wins, like this year’s top awards sweep by South
07
February
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Trust in science a complicated matter, says Christian professor

Rising skepticism can signal competing values.

It took Denis Lamoureux 13 years and four graduate degrees to accept his first biology lesson. In the early 1990s, Lamoureux was a University of Alberta doctoral student studying dental
05
February
2020
| 22:25 America/Tegucigalpa

‘Shakespeare’s Dog’ puts spotlight on our deep connection with canines

U of A production of play about the Bard’s best friend takes audience engagement to new level with service and rescue dogs in theatre lobby.

Almost nothing is known about Shakespeare’s “lost years,” the seven-year period before he arrived in London to begin his legendary career in the theatre. One of the most daring fictional accounts
05
February
2020
| 14:05 America/Tegucigalpa

History of black immigration sheds light on forgotten connection between Alberta and Oklahoma

New book about “America’s weirdest state” reveals unexpected cultural links to Alberta.

One day in 1911, 194 men, women and children from Oklahoma stepped off a train in Edmonton, hoping they had finally reached the promised land.  Within a matter of weeks, a quarter of the city
31
January
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Visual art project conveys emotional stories of head and neck cancer survivors

Collaborative project, exhibition and book blend art and medicine to convey life-changing impact of cancer on patients.

A collaborative project at the University of Alberta—the first of its kind in Canada—aims to convey through visual art the emotional turmoil survivors of head and neck cancer endure. Entitled
24
January
2020
| 20:46 America/Tegucigalpa

Edmonton and U of A to host Canada's biggest academic conference in spring 2021

The University of Alberta will host more than 8,000 academics during the 2021 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Edmonton will be the gathering place for a social sciences and humanities exploration of the North in 2021 when the University of Alberta hosts Canada’s largest annual academic conference. “2021
24
January
2020
| 14:00 America/Tegucigalpa

Female bigamists often treated lightly by judges, researcher finds

Historical perspective on multiple marriages by women calls into question contemporary matrimony laws, says U of A historian.

When “Britain’s most notorious bigamist,” Emily Horne, was handed a 10-month suspended prison sentence in 2009 for marrying five times without ever divorcing, her gender caught many off